Splitsider

Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

This Week In Web Videos: Skit Box

“We recognised that there was a serious lack of female driven comedy content on the web, and we wanted to change that,” says Adele Vuko, one prong of the three-woman Australian sketch comedy onslaught that is Skit Box.

Vuko’s right.

There’s not a lot of good female-driven comedy on the web, or on TV. Girls is fantastic but it’s not sketch and beyond that, 2 Broke Girls exemplifies the kind of “comedy” that’s getting enough popular attention to inspire network renewals. Horrifying as that is. Vuko has hit upon a dearth in the market, but she and her cohorts have done more than recognize a hole. They’ve begun to fill it.

Created, written by, and starring Vuko, Sarah Bishop and Greta Lee Jackson, the 5-episode preview into what I believe has the potential to grow into a 22-minute series cable series was conceived, written, and filmed in just three months, impressive even by crunched web video production standards. Videos have garnered a collective 50,000 views in just over a month. Not a bad count, but one that should grow much higher once the word’s out.

Skit Box is accessible: smart and subtle, without being self-indulgent or alienating. It feels organic in much the same way that Lena Dunhams’s Delusional Downtown Divas does, a complex delivery in sketch comedy, where the ground is often tread by performers afraid to experiment with winding, muted punch lines, and a testament to the overall quality of this series.

Here are three reasons to watch.

  1. Standard sketch deviation
  2. Distinct female POV
  3. Strong characters

Episode 1: Pam’s Romance Variety Hour

While billed as “sketch,” episodes play more like excerpts from a larger arc, chock-full of subtle character traits that draw viewers in while flying in the face of the comedic form’s neuroses about jokes and targets being instantly and indisputably clear.

Episode 4: Desperate Girls Roll Up on Construction Workers

Just because it’s a show made by and starring females doesn’t mean humor should be female-specific, and it’s not. But Skit Box jokes are often born out of the female perspective, making everything feel more authentic and original.

Episode 5: The Artist


One thing sketch comedy cannot do without is strong characters and there are no shortage of those here.