Splitsider

Wednesday, February 6th, 2013

The Entire Podcast Community Is in Danger Because of a Patent Troll Case

A patent licensing company called Personal Audio LLC has claimed that it owns a patent to podcasting technology and has sent letters to a bunch of podcasters, requesting to be paid for the use of said technology. The patent itself is for an "apparatus for disseminating a series of episodes represented by media files via the Internet as said episodes become available," which is incredibly vague and ridiculous. This represents a great threat to the booming comedy podcast scene, and industry leaders like Marc Maron, Chris Hardwick, Jesse Thorn, Joe Rogan, Kevin Smith, Dan Harmon, and Earwolf have all taken to Twitter to spread the word about the dangers of this situation.

Personal Audio sued Adam Carolla's company ACE Broadcasting and HowStuffWorks.com over this same patent last month, but hopefully they stop with this parasitic bullshit there. If you are one of the estimated two million Americans who has their own podcast (that's probably an inaccurate estimate) or are just a fan of this amazing medium, head on over to the Electronic Frontier Foundation so you can read up on the facts and get involved in this (sort of) important fight.

  • Robo

    Wow, so its cool for Adam Carrolla to get sued, but everyone else not so much?

    Let the Adam Carolla shit go, man. It makes you look bitter

    • brijazz012

      There's nothing in this article that implies that it's "cool" for Carolla to get sued.

    • http://twitter.com/bradfordevans Bradford Evans

      I didn't say I support the Carolla lawsuit in any way or think it's "cool." It's just as bad as anyone else getting sued.

    • Owen

      Adam Carrolla is kinda terrible, but the article never implied it was cool.

  • http://www.FiveFeetOfFury.com/ Kathy Shaidle

    Agreed: we gotta fight this.

    But…

    A creaky old GenXer asks:

    Is there some knee jerk Millennial gen. reason everything has to be called a "community"? especially things that are essentially (yay!) capitalistic profit seeking enterprises — podcasts, comedy clubs — made up of people who frequently aren't very "nice" and hate/are jealous of each other?

    Do you call things like that "communities" to take the edge off that fact, and the fact that we're — gasp!!! — FIGHTING something? Without wearing bike helmets or using Purell or getting our moms to take us to the planning meetings in their minivans, even?

    I'm heartened by the unapologetic use of the word "parasitic," however. There may still be hope for America's youth.