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The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show: Space Suit/Broadway Costume Production

This week on The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show, Jeff is joined by Kari Love, a former Broadway costume producer who now helps build prototype space suits for commercial use, and for space tourists to go into space with. They talk about how she got started on Broadway, what it was like working on the Spiderman musical, how she made the transition into space suits and how the two fields are similar.

"I love researching historical eras. A lot people liked to do their research from a fashion history standpoint, whereas I really liked to research from a greater historical context point of view. So if I need a character to be a servant, I start looking up crazy photographs that maybe isn't a part of the costume history that is in textbook, and instead just looked at a lot of photographs of coal miners. Something like that is where my interest laid in terms of the research. But then you also have color relationships, text and subtext, personality choices and so on." – Kari Love on what she found interesting in costume producing.

"It did affect me a lot. They actually stopped the production at some point. There were stories that they had started building sets and those set pieces were thrown away, because there was questions about where the money was going to come from. That is why the budget balooned so much. This was also around the time that Disney was buying Marvel, so there was a lot of company stuff going on. The development period and approval process was just so long because there was so many people involved during this time. There was a lot of stuff up in the air when they rewrote the show. So i think it was very tumultuous for everyone involved." – Kari Love on working on Spiderman

"The problem with spacesuits is that you can't really talk about spacesuits. It's like fight club that way. In the US government, spacesuits and their fabrication is restricted information. So you can't export information about spacesuit requirements, I can't show off patterns, I can't take a picture of the tech and show it on the Twitter. I think the reason why it exists is because a lot of the stuff that exists in spacesuits also exists in other military equipment." – Kari Love on the one problem with spacesuits.

"It was awesome, but I had to turn off my space nerd voice, but it was totally worth it to just be able to enjoy the film. If I have to mention one of the things, it's that she just unzips her spacesuit and drifts out of it. My space nerd voice said: you can't take off your spacesuit by yourself. You need an assistant to open all of those latches. And then she just drifts out of it in booty shorts and a tanktop. She would have a lot more on if it was real. It's not sexy, but she would be wearing an adult diaper." – Kari Love on Gravity.

This episode is sponsored by Audible. Head over to audiblepodcast.com/jeffrubin to grab a 30 free trial of Audible and a free audiobook of your choosing! Any book you want, for free!

The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show: Snood Creator David Dobson

This week on the Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show, Jeff is joined by the creator of Snood, David Dobson. They talk about how he got into programming and video games, how Snood became so popular and went "viral", and what the poems in Snood were for.

"I applied my limited artistic ability to Snood and people said 'oh this is so retro and cool', and I was like 'this is the same crappy style I was making for my other games' but I think it fit this style of game better. People expected the space games to look really cool, but this artistic style fit the casual game or puzzle game better." – David Dobson on the graphics in Snood.

"I was just looking for something that wasn't a trademarked name of another game, and that sounded kind of goofy. So I just picked it because it was in my head at the time and it seemed like another game for it." – David Dobson on how he picked the name Snood.

"If you were in college at that point, only maybe a quarter of the people had computers, so people would rely on going to a computer lab or borrowing someones computer. So computers were much more communal. So people would see someone else play Snood on their computer, and then go home for break and install it on their home computer. It really spread like that, we had no marketing budget." – David Dobson on how the game spread.

This episode is sponsored by Audible. Head over to audiblepodcast.com/jeffrubin to grab a 30 free trial of Audible and a free audiobook of your choosing! Any book you want, for free!

The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show: Nickelodeon Historian Mathew Klickstein

This week on the Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin show, Jeff is joined by Mathew Klickstein, the author of the book Slimed!: An Oral History Of Nickelodeon’s Golden Age. They talk about how he defined Nickelodeons golden age, Shel Silverstein, what made Nickelodeon great, Spongebob, the slime itself and why the golden age ended.

"Nickelodeon is the second or third cable channel ever invented. It was a true experiment, they used it as something called narrowcasting instead of broadcasting. Suddenly they said "what about a channel just for kids?" and later "what about a channel just for music?" No one thought to do that, and Nickelodeon was an experiment in that." – Mathew Klickstein on the birth of Nickelodeon.

"A lot of this stuff we take for granted, because that is just how it's done today, but before this was such a wild idea because this was people coming from radio and magazines going into TV. They had this wild and revolutionizing idea that instead of promoting the shows only, lets promote the whole network. Let's create a destination. You will watch this show because it is on Nickelodeon. So let's actually talk about Nickelodeon in the promos. It was because they were coming from radio, and radio had done that forever." – Mathew Klickstein on how Nickelodeon became a popular channel.

This episode is sponsored by Audible. Head over to audiblepodcast.com/jeffrubin to grab a 30 free trial of Audible and a free audiobook of your choosing! Any book you want, for free!

The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show: The Meta Game with The Indoor Kids and Patrick Cassels

This week on this extra curricular Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show, Jeff appears on a cross-over podcast episode with the Indoor Kids' Kumail and Emily, with Patrick Cassels as well. They play the Meta Game and during it they have to make arguments for why dodgeball is the most stressful thing, why saying Google will get you laid, and why Hungry Hungry Hippos is the best symbol for people who have no friends.

"Kids are taught communication skills in school, they are taught English, but are they ever taught silence, are they ever taught the importance of listening? They are taught art and music, but are they ever really taught about what challenges what the boundaries of what music can be. I think John Cage's work really exemplifies this and it is 4 min and 33 seconds long, how often are kids really required to stay silent for that long?" – Emily with her Don Draper-esque presentation on why John Cage's 4'33' should be taught in school.

This episode is sponsored by Audible. Head over to audiblepodcast.com/jeffrubin to grab a 30 free trial of Audible and a free audiobook of your choosing! Any book you want, for free!

The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show: Romance Novel Editing with Elizabeth Poteet

This week on The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show, Jeff talks to Elizabeth Poteet, a romance novel editor. They talk about all different genres of romance novels, the difference between romance novels and erotica, why no one has ever written a caveman romance novel, and the weird crossovers in the fan-fiction community.

"50 Shades of Grey came from Twilight fan fiction. It was some person's imagining of how that dominant/submissive relationship between Bella and Edward would play out on a sexual scale and without the vampirism." – Elizabeth Poteet on 50 Shades' origin.

"I think the best eroticas are the once that do have stories attached to them. The ones that have character development and aren't just about a man and a woman and another woman. I think the main thing about erotica is that visual images aren't as arousing to women as words are. You don't have the bad production quality of a porno, you have a written word and an escapist's fantasy. It lets you escape to a world where people can be as promiscuous as they want without any ramifications." – Elizabeth Poteet on the difference between a porno and an erotica novel.

"I think it is a very viable source for people who want to be writers. If you think about it it is a way for you to hone your skills, develop your characters, and work on your dialogue within a safe community of readers and people who are enthusiastic about the subject. You don't have to create your own world and you can work within a story that is already provided. So I see them as very fertile breeding grounds for future authors." – Elizabeth Poteet on fan fiction.

This episode is sponsored by Audible. Head over to audiblepodcast.com/jeffrubin to grab a 30 free trial of Audible and a free audiobook of your choosing! Any book you want, for free!

The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show: Pizza Boxes with Scott Wiener

This week on The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show, Jeff talks to Scott Wiener about his new book Viva la Pizza and pizza boxes in general. Scott explains his interest in pizzaboxes, how he wrote the book and they discuss the different art styles on pizza boxes from around the world.

"You can flip open any page off the book and look at a pizza box and be like oh, that is pretty cool, but then if you read what is in there, it's going to reference another page of the book where you can read more about similar motives on other boxes." – Scott Wiener on what his book is going to contain.

"Every time I interviewed someone who designed a generic box, I was interested in knowing why. Why have that bush out front, why have that table with two glasses of wine and no people sitting at it? Some of these images are really bizarre, and when you take time to look at it, it becomes really interesting. When you buy pizza, it's not like when you buy toothpaste and you look at the package. The package comes with it after you've already paid the money, so they can put anything they want on there. Why even put art on there?" - Scott Wiener on his interest in pizza box art.

This episode is sponsored by Audible. Head over to audiblepodcast.com/jeffrubin to grab a 30 free trial of Audible and a free audiobook of your choosing! Any book you want, for free!

The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show: 'Hoarders' Cleaner Matt Paxton

This week on the Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin show, Jeff talks to Extreme Cleaner Matt Paxton from the show Hoarders. They talk about how he got into cleaning hoarders' houses, what things you discover when cleaning a hoarders house, what makes people a hoarder, and what it takes to get out of a hoarding lifestyle.

"You just had to go in and start doing houses. I did like 300 houses before I got on the show. No one else had the time with people in the houses like I did." – Matt Paxton on how he got picked up for the A&E show.

"We turn down more jobs than we accept, and it is always because the hoarder is not ready. It is an expensive job, and we don't want to take twenty grand from the family if the house is going to fill right back up in a month. Often we make sure that the hoarder is going to therapy and we make sure they actually want to change." – Matt Paxton on why they sometimes have to turn down some jobs.

"My belief is that your house should be little messy, if it is perfect it's too far. Your house should be lived in, that is reality. Don't go to bed unless the sink is empty and each night clean a room for 10 minutes." – Matt Paxton's house cleaning advice.

This episode is sponsored by Audible. Head over to audiblepodcast.com/jeffrubin to grab a 30 free trial of Audible and a free audiobook of your choosing! Any book you want, for free!

The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show: The 'Breaking Bad' Series Finale

This week on the Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show, Jeff Rubin, CollegeHumor's Pat Cassels, and Entertainment Weekly's Darren Frannich sit down to discuss Breaking Bad's finale, fifth season, and place among the pantheon of great shows. Full of spoilers, obviously, so don't listen unless you are caught up!

This episode is sponsored by Audible. Head over to audiblepodcast.com/jeffrubin to grab a 30 free trial of Audible and a free audiobook of your choosing! Any book you want, for free!

The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show: New York Bucket List

This week on the Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin show, Jeff is making a New York bucket list to prepare for his move to Los Angeles. To help him he brings on previous guests who live in New York, to suggest something for his bucket list.

"We got to the jet skis and the guy was like, all right so here is the gas, here is the emergency shutoff, I'm going to pin that to the jacket and okay here we go, and this guy just takes off at 40 mph, and just leaves us in the dust. We can barely see our tour guide on the horizon." – Charlie Todd on the service you get at Jetty Jumpers, a Jet Ski Tour of New York.

"They have every single part of the cow imaginable and you grill it up yourself in the middle of the table. They tell you how long on each side you are supposed to grill it for, and you dunk it in some sauce afterwards. It's super fun and interactive." – Adam Frucci on his suggestion Takashi a Japanese beef restaurant.

"With the people getting on and off, you see a lot of costumes, and even if it is in 2 in the afternoon people are already drunk. There is this shared experience vibe where everyone is like 'we are all headed somewhere, we all look ridiculous and everyone is trying to figure out what everyone is.' It is one of those cool New York moments, where everyone feels like we are all here together being young and dumb." - Sarah Schneider on why riding the subway on Halloween Night should be on Jeff's bucket list.

This episode is sponsored by Audible. Head over to audiblepodcast.com/jeffrubin to grab a 30 free trial of Audible and a free audiobook of your choosing! Any book you want, for free!

The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show: Episode 100 with Jeff Rubin's Mom

This week is the Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show's 100th episode! To celebrate, Jeff brought in his mom to help him share some stories about his life. They talk about his childhood, what she thought of the movies Jeff liked, what she thinks about him working at CollegeHumor and much much more.

"It looks like a Dr. Seuss book, but it's not, and it is a really interesting book. It's about these dogs and they are trying to get places. It's actually a lot more interesting than we make it sound." – Jeff Rubin on his favorite book as a child Go, Dog. Go.

"I remember watching Spaceballs over and over as a kid, which is weird, because it's not especially a kid's movie. It's like a Mel Brooks movie for old jews. I wasn't into Star Wars either, I was too young. Not only did I not understand the jokes, I didn't even get the Star Wars references. I think I learned Star Wars via Spaceballs." - Jeff Rubin on a movie he would watch a lot as a kid.

This episode is sponsored by Audible. Head over to audiblepodcast.com/jeffrubin to grab a 30 free trial of Audible and a free audiobook of your choosing! Any book you want, for free!

The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show: Hey, Know What's Cool 2 with Emily Axford and Streeter Seidell

This week on The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show, Streeter Seidell and Emily Axford join Jeff and take turns trying to impress each other with cool facts. Topics covered include Roman fashion, canine language, and three-point seatbelts.

This episode is sponsored by Audible. Head over to audiblepodcast.com/jeffrubin to grab a 30 free trial of Audible and a free audiobook of your choosing! Any book you want, for free!

The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show: 'Breaking Bad' with Chuck Klosterman

This week on the Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin, Jeff talks about the only thing on his mind at the moment: Breaking Bad. To do this he brought in Chuck Klosterman and during this episode they talk about the effect the ending has on a TV show's legacy, whether or not deleted scenes are canon and who's the best villain on TV.

"People who really sympathize with Jesse and want Jesse to somehow eliminate Walt and become the center of the show, are people who watch television with the hope that it is just an unreal version of life and that justice really matters. If you are rooting for Walt you are almost rooting for story and villain. You don't want this to happen to anyone you know, but you see this show more as fiction." — Klosterman's theory on how who you root for in Breaking Bad tells something about yourself.

"It is so unique. I can't think of any other example, where I am both very much aware of who the villain is, and very much on his side." — Klosterman on why Breaking Bad is the best show on TV.

"Omar's central ethic is that he only robs from criminals, and he sticks to his ethics. Walt however keeps expanding on his ethics. Walt cares the least about his own rules. He will change his rules to fit the scenario, where Omar would not." — Chuck Klosterman on the difference in ethics between Walt and Omar from The Wire.

This episode is sponsored by Audible. Head over to audiblepodcast.com/jeffrubin to grab a 30 free trial of Audible and a free audiobook of your choosing! Any book you want, for free!

The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show: Conspiracy Theories II with Patrick Cassels

This week The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show is the long awaited sequel to the first conspiracy theories episode. Jeff talks to Patrick Cassels about their favorite pop culture conspiracy theories like Rebecca Black's song "Friday" being a metaphor for the JFK assassination, an arcade game called Polybius being a psychological weapon, and Taylor Swift being an active member of 4chan.

"The reason I'm skeptical, is that the song's popularity seems like such luck and a random occurrence. I'd be more impressed if they made Rebecca Black and Friday really popular than they got a codified message into a song. Even the Illuminati couldn't have pulled that off." – Jeff thoughts on the Rebecca Black conspiracy.

"Jeff, you seem like you'd join onto any theory, but you will also not care that much. If you were told that Lizard people run the world, you'd be like 'Alright, how does that change my day to day? It doesn't? Okay cool.'" – Patrick Cassels on Jeff's attitude towards conspiracy theories.

"The rest of these theories are all about mind control, the government and satan, the biggest themes you can think about. This one is relatively very small scale. I think it speaks to a) how popular Taylor Swift is and b) how fascinating this would be if it was true." – Patrick Cassels on the appeal of the Taylor Swift/4chan theory.

This episode is sponsored by Audible. Head over to audiblepodcast.com/jeffrubin to grab a 30 free trial of Audible and a free audiobook of your choosing! Any book you want, for free!

The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show: Archie Comics Writer Dan Parent

This week on The Jeff Rubin Jeff Rubin Show, Jeff talks to Dan Parent, a comic book writer and artist probably best known for his work with Archie Comics. He talks to him about Kevin Keller, the first gay character in the Archie universe and a character that Dan pitched, the different universes of Archie Comics, what it's like at the Kubert school, and what we can expect from the upcoming Archie movie.

"As a kid you think it is cool, because you see this nerdy guy being chased after by these gorgeous girls, and you can't figure out why. It's also that idyllic way to grow up. You grow up thinking everything is like Riverdale, and its a cool place to hang out and all these cool friends. It's sort of like comfort food for kids." – Dan Parent on Archie's appeal to kids.

"Our books are pretty seeped in romance, so there are a lot of fantasies and things like that, and that is the core of what made Archie continue on all these years. If you had to narrow it down to one thing it is the Veronica, Betty, Archie love triangle." – Dan Parent on what the core of Archie Comics is.

This episode is sponsored by Audible. Head over to audiblepodcast.com/jeffrubin to grab a 30 free trial of Audible and a free audiobook of your choosing! Any book you want, for free!