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Posts tagged as Baratunde Thurston

Check Out 'The Harvard Crimson's Comedy Issue

Harvard's daily newspaper The Crimson published a new comedy-centric issue of its weekly magazine Fifteen Minutes dedicated to the university's long history with humor, and it's full of great insight from Harvard grads like Spy magazine co-founder Kurt Andersen, former Simpsons showrunner Mike Reiss, television writer/producer Nell Scovell, comedian/author Baratunde Thurston, Office alum B.J. Novak, and more. Here's an excerpt from Mike Reiss's essay "Harvard Comedy (and Other Oxymorons)":

Back in the '70s, Harvard Comedy was considered an oxymoron. Like jumbo shrimp. Or Fox News. (For you legacies, an oxymoron is a contradiction in terms. [For you double legacies, a contradiction is… oh, forget it. You'd [...]

Black Ops: 'Post-Racial' Comedy in the Age of Obama

In 2010, former troupe-mates Donald Glover and DC Pierson returned from Los Angeles to perform at The Creek and The Cave, in New York City. Glover was tossed a question from an audience member: What's it like working with Chevy Chase? In response, he described how Chase had delivered a 40-minute lecture to Saturday Night Live cast member Bobby Moynihan laying out the case for why Glover has to be homosexual, which he is not. "That's the only way a guy like Chevy Chase has of processing a black guy who looks like me, talks like me, dresses like me," said Glover on stage that night. "That's how alien [...]

Baratunde Thurston Leaves 'The Onion'; Argues for the Importance of Comedy

"…in an increasingly noisy world of information and digital interactions, comedy can still deliver the truth in a way that captures people's attention and does so in an essentially human way. As the definition of media grows from 'news' and 'video' to anything that acts as an interface to our world (duh, medium!), comedy must follow. Given the world we live in, that means the bombardment of marketing messages we experience, all of our online and digital experiences and the physical world." - Baratunde Thurston, in a post on his blog that announces his departure from The Onion and discusses the importance of comedy in today's society.