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Posts tagged as quicklink

'Live from New York' Co-Author Jim Miller on How 'SNL' Has Changed and Stayed the Same

"I know that there were a lot of people, veteran SNL watchers, me, even, that thought that there might have been more of a house cleaning. And I think that at the end of the day, Lorne understands development arcs, and for all we know, there might have been something in a particular sketch that Lorne saw of somebody, and he may have been ready to let them go. And he saw something in one sketch and thought, Okay, wait, if they can do that, that's worth holding on to. We're going to get them to the next level. … You know, it’s not always, Well, they didn't have a [...]

'Grantland' Profiles 'SNL' Legend Phil "The Glue" Hartman

"Here's why it’s difficult to properly appreciate Phil Hartman. Because his characters were 20 percent droid. Because he reminded you more of your dad than your best pal. Because Hartman’s biggest gift was a kind of comedic graciousness, which he used to hide the show's seams and to make other funny people look good. As the writer Steve Lookner put it, 'How many people can you say that about on Saturday Night Live?'"

- Grantland examines the life, talent, and career of SNL legend Phil Hartman in a new feature out today called "The Glue."

'Grantland' Examines the Mellowing Lorne Michaels Empire

"But those who thought a severe housecleaning was in store this summer for the upcoming 40th season have been surprised; there was no bloodbath, no mass firings, none of the seismic upheavals of the past. Only four cast members were voted off the island once the 39th season ended, and some insiders believe this departure from precedent can be traced to changes in Michaels's demeanor, a mellowing evident since, roughly, the late 1990s."

- Live from New York co-writer James Andrew Miller examines the past, present, and future of the Lorne Michaels empire in a new feature for Grantland.

Brooks Wheelan Talks About His Hiring and Firing from 'SNL'

"I feel like I was hired because they hired so many new cast members, and I feel like I was let go because they hired too many new cast members. So I can't really fault them. That's part of the reason I was there and that's part of the reason I was let go. … They do their own stuff and they clearly know what works."

- Standup Brooks Wheelan discusses his recent firing from SNL in a new interview with The Wrap, in which he says he's looking forward to living a more "Forrest Gump life."

Aubrey Plaza Insists She's Not Always Mocking People

"I think it’s just the tone of my voice that throws people off. Zooey Deschanel recently told me, 'Everything that you say to someone sounds like you’re mocking them.' I was like, 'But I’m not.' And she was like, 'Even when you just said that, it sounded like you were mocking me.'"

- Aubrey Plaza talks about her voice, being in a constant state of sarcasm, and her latest film projects in a new interview with NY Times Magazine.

Chris Rock on Joan Rivers: "We Liked Johnny Carson, But We Loved Joan Rivers"

"There's a weird thing that happens in art when you meet somebody and they are 30 years older than you. But if you last in the business long enough, one day you're the same age–you're peers. The last few years, I would bump into her and talk comedy. I just loved Joan Rivers. My family, we watched The Tonight Show for Rivers. We liked Johnny Carson, but we loved Joan Rivers. I know I'm going to get shit for that. But that's how it was in Bed-Stuy."

- Chris Rock fondly remembers Joan Rivers and her brief stint as Tonight Show host for Variety.

Tim Heidecker Says 'Tim and Eric's Bedtime Stories' Is a Reflection of Our "Shit Culture"

"Once we started making the show, and we saw what we were actually doing, I sort of thought, Well, this show is not going to make you feel good. And we shouldn’t be feeling good! We’re shit people. We’re a shit culture. This is like punishment for being horrible. There’s so much feel-good stuff that comes out, especially in comedy now, where things are very cute and very clever and sort of like everybody’s in on the joke and winking. I feel like our show tends to try to be like a little more reminding of how awful things really are in the world."

- In a new interview [...]

'The A.V. Club' Celebrates 'All That' as "the 'SNL' for Kids"

"All That's attempt at giving children of the '90s their own SNL began with the masterstroke Lorne Michaels hit upon nearly two decades earlier: If your comedy show is supposed to reach a certain generation, let that generation tell the jokes themselves. … If Roundhouse was a community-theater production parents dragged their kids to, All That was like those kids keeping themselves entertained in the darkened playhouse: Passing private jokes, engaging in light slapstick with siblings, generally ridiculing the stuffiness of grown-up life."

- The A.V. Club examines the impact of Nickelodeon's All That as the SNL for kids of the '90s.

The Catholic League Is Cautiously Hopeful About 'Black Jesus'

"If the goal is to lure young people to take a closer look at Jesus, the Son of God, that is noble… But if so, it is not a good sociological sign: Must we debase Jesus to make him real? It will be interesting to see how the show develops, and how the audience reacts to the Jesus message, however twisted his delivery."

- President of the Catholic League Bill Donahue addresses Adult Swim's new show Black Jesus in an official statement calling the show's depiction of Jesus a "mixed bag" who has "many redeeming qualities."

Larry David Talks with 'The New York Times' About His Upcoming Broadway Debut

"I haven't been in a play since the eighth grade, when I did Charley’s Aunt. I seem to remember wearing a dress. That's it. And I'm not even really an actor. But I'm still sleeping at night, and I hope that continues."

- Larry David looks forward to his Broadway debut in Fish in the Dark in a new interview with The New York Times.

Amy Sedaris on Colbert: "He Has This Whole Bag of Tricks People Haven't Even Seen Yet"

"Well, he's got that Southern charm. He's genuinely interested. He's engaging. He's a very positive person. He can see the good in everything. I think he'll go to that other character that he plays on that show because that's part of him, too. He'll mix it. But once you're out there and there's a live audience, everyone's playing a different version of themselves. You know? There's a camera in front of you. There's an audience. You automatically are different. I just think people will see this other side to him, because he has this whole bag of tricks people haven't even seen yet."

- Amy Sedaris — current star of [...]

Matt Mira on Transitioning from Apple Employee to '@midnight' Writer

"I feel like a lot of people are afraid to take that step, and I was afraid too, but it just came to a point where I realized I have to do this. I can't keep going home with no brain power because I'm dealing with shitty people with broken iPads. You can't let a day job stop you from doing the thing you're most passionate about. For me it was, 'I'm gonna keep doing this podcast, doing standup at night. If I'm tired at work, I'll work fewer hours, but I've got to do this.'"

- Fast Company talks with @midnight writer and Nerdist cohost Matt Mira about [...]

'The Atlantic' Says 'Last Week Tonight' Is "Making a Difference in the Real World"

"This is the magic of John Oliver. It's been only 14 episodes so far (the show is slated for 19 this season) but the Last Week Tonight team has found a way to take a seemingly complicated issue, remove the talking points and cultural baggage surrounding it, break it into understandable parts—and then slowly rebuild it. It's an ingenious formula that's making a difference in the real world."

- Last Week Tonight with John Oliver is showered with more well-deserved praise in a new Atlantic piece called "How John Oliver Beats Apathy."

Daniel Radcliffe Explains His Love for the American 'Office'

"When something is successful in Britain, we go, 'Okay, let's stop it before we screw it up.' And when something is successful over here, they go, 'Okay, let's keep making this a success until it's not a success.' And I think that it is a kind of very different attitude, but I'm actually really glad for that, because as I said, when the idea of an American version of that program came out, it sounded like sacrilege. And now, frankly, I look at those final episodes and they are so emotionally satisfying and grounded in a way that I don't think the British Office ever got the chance to be."

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