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Posts tagged as The Village Voice

Paul Feig on the Decline of the Blockbuster Rom-Com

As the current wisdom goes: Men are stubborn; women are flexible. "It's the 'Will you hold my purse?' theory," Feig explains. "A guy's in a store with his wife or girlfriend and she asks him to hold her purse, it's, like, Kryptonite or something. They have to hold it so that no one around them thinks it's theirs. But if a guy says to his wife or girlfriend, 'Can you hold my backpack?' she's like, 'Sure.' She doesn't give a shit. I think Hollywood banks on that."

- from the Village Voice article "Who Killed the Romantic Comedy?" in which director Paul Feig explains why a male "no" carries [...]

Donald Glover Is Your Neo-Michael Jackson

The tag line on Donald Glover's Village Voice interview is "The comedian/writer/emo rapper is on a collision course with stardom. The only question is, will he survive?" Clearly yes, right? Aside from drinking and poaching ladies from under DC Pierson's nose, there is little to no evidence in the text that we're looking at the next comedy train wreck here. I guess every article needs a hook, but come on; let's not pull a tragic hero figure out of thin air. Instead, the interview actually details how Donald Glover continues to consistently and thoroughly handle his business. He's got that ambition, baby. "If one day, I can [...]

The Village Voice On The Comedian As Artist

Respect: typically we can't get none of it. However, in The Village Voice article, "Have You Heard the One About the Art Scene Embracing Comedians?," author Martha Schwendener argues that the comedy scene  is currently getting a shout-out from the world of art. For example, this Saturday MOMA P.S.1 is hosting a showcase of comedians like Jon Glaser, Jenny Slate, Reggie Watts, Rory Scovel and Maeve Higgins, with the intent to highlight comedians as the artists they are. Comedy and art, the article argues, both share the uncertainty and structurelessness that creates an environment where "the crackpot can thrive," while comedy does not have the safeguards of museums [...]