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Follow Friday: Jon Sender (@Senderblock23)

Everybody fancies themselves as some sort of wizard that can conjure up laughter by a few strokes of a keyboard, but only a few tweeters are truly worthy enough to have all of their witticisms transmitted to you, the ever busy comedy fan trying to navigate through an increasingly congested internet. Every Friday we'll make your life a little bit easier by introducing you to an individual that you might not know about who consistently makes us laugh and momentarily forget that other days of the week exist.

(If you're reading this from an RSS feed, jump on over to the website where you can actually view the tweets for an optimal level of enjoyment.)

Jon Sender (@senderblock23) is a benevolent, humorous individual who was kind enough to fill us in on the stories behind some of his funniest tweets.

 

"I've never sat in bed eating cereal. I've never eaten fruity pebbles. This joke was just an extension of my finding a small amount of humor in serial and cereal sounding identical. I didn't think much of that tweet but then some famous person RTd it and it went viral. Do I appreciate that? Nope. Why? Because I'm garbage." READ MORE

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Vine 5 Film Festival: …But There is Lemonade

Vine is a toy from Twitter that challenges users to make the most profound work ever committed to video in exactly six seconds. Or at the very least, challenges comedians to bring a little more laughter into this world. Every Tuesday we showcase five of the funniest short shorts of the past week.

Your RSS feed might be difficult and not show the videos, but trust us – they are there.

Ryan McHenry, one of the Vine app's biggest stars thanks to his creation of the very popular "Ryan Gosling Wont Eat His Cereal" series, was diagnosed with cancer recently. A lot of viners checked in to make videos showing their love and support for his recovery, most notably a beautiful sounding and NSFW ditty about what cancer can do to itself. An IndieGogo fundraiser has been created to help fund McHenry's recovery, featuring rewards generously offered from a couple of the more popular app users, all for someone most of them have never met in person — sometimes the internet can be a good thing.

Needless to say, we wish him the best of luck and a speedy and full recovery. But in the meantime, here are the funniest vines from this past week: READ MORE

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'Please Like Me' Is the Best New TV Comedy You've Never Heard Of

All six episodes of the first season of Please Like Me premiered last Thursday on Pivot, a cable network that launched on that very same day. Episodes of the show will continue to run on the very young channel fairly often for the foreseeable future. The first episode is available to watch on Pivot's website.

This review contains mild spoilers.

Signing on to forty million homes last week, Pivot – a network that is unabashedly devoted to appealing to Millennials – devoted three hours of its very first prime time programming1 on an Australian import titled Please Like Me, a half hour comedy-drama based on the autobiographical stand-up of 26-year-old Aussie comedian Josh Thomas. In a failed attempt to attract some controversy, Pivot President Evan Shapiro said that Please Like Me was just like Girls, "If 'Girls' had a soul." This was sort of correct – it's more like Girls but funnier. READ MORE

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Actually, *Pushes Glasses Back Onto Face* the 'Diner' TV Pilot Was the First Show About Nothing

Barry Levinson's 1982 film Diner is a classic. Funny, original, and engrossing, it has been credited with influencing a huge swath of what we consider to be the best comedy in movies and television over the past twenty or so years. It paid attention to the seemingly mundane past-time of young adults in their early twenties bullshitting about everything and nothing, making the art of talking around a topic of dubious significance in circles no longer just for middle aged men (John Cassavetes' Husbands) or specifically for Wallace Shawn (My Dinner With Andre). As S.L. Price noted in his Vanity Fair article about the movie in 2012, it opened the doors for directors like Quentin Tarantino to let their characters sketch in their inner lives by pontificating about Big Macs, and for Judd Apatow to get us to know the Knocked Up guys better by having them spend time discussing how great Eric Bana was in Munich. It also would effect television too, most notably Seinfeld and their frank conversations about button placement, and later Larry David and all of the improvised conversations on Curb Your Enthusiasm. Cheers, a show that spent most of its time in one place, and premiered the same year Diner opened, had its characters talk their way into becoming one of the most critically acclaimed and loved sitcoms of all time.

What is far less written about is the television pilot that attempted to pick up right where and when the movie left off, in Baltimore in the very beginning of 1960. Based off of his sudden financial and artistic success, Levinson wrote and directed a Diner pilot for CBS that didn't make it to series. It got the summer burn-off treatment and aired thirty years ago this Thursday, only to be remembered again by the fine folks at the long defunct Trio Network ten years ago as part of their "Brilliant But Cancelled" series, and once more in the wondrous right here and now. But despite the movie's influence on television, the small screen version proved to be faulty and awkward, the charms of the film failing to track. READ MORE

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Follow Friday: @KateBerlant

Everybody fancies themselves as some sort of wizard that can conjure up laughter by a few strokes of a keyboard, but only a few tweeters are truly worthy enough to have all of their witticisms transmitted to you, the ever busy comedy fan trying to navigate through an increasingly congested internet. Every Friday we'll make your life a little bit easier by introducing you to an individual that you might not know about who consistently makes us laugh and momentarily forget that other days of the week exist.

(If you're reading this from an RSS feed, jump on over to the website where you can actually view the tweets for an optimal level of enjoyment.)

Kate Berlant (@KateBerlant) is one of those stand-up comedians that you are told to watch out for in the best way possible. She was kind enough to elaborate (tersely, as is her style) on a few of her funniest tweets.

 

"I tweeted this while immersed in my Facebook vulnerability trashcan." READ MORE

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Vine 5 Film Festival: Absolutely No Lemons

Vine is a toy from Twitter that challenges users to make the most profound work ever committed to video in exactly six seconds. Or at the very least, challenges comedians to bring a little more laughter into this world. Every Tuesday we showcase five of the funniest short shorts of the past week.

Your RSS feed might be difficult and not show the videos, but trust us – they are there.

This week on Vine the parallels between Kanye West and Cookie Monster finally revealed themselves, midwives that barely passed their mmidwife take home exam were put to the test, pimps got the love they deserve, the lemon people lawyered up, and multi-tasking was put to task. READ MORE

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Our Favorite Woody Allen Movies

Woody Allen's 43rd writer/director effort, Blue Jasmine, made its debut in movie theaters across the country this past weekend. 43 is a lot. Allen has made so many films at this point, of different combinations of his Chaplin, Hope, Fellini and Bergman influences, that choosing a favorite out of all of them is both a pointless and important exercise: pointless because there isn't a right or wrong answer, important because your answer says a lot about what you find funny, and/or moving.

With that in mind, please do not judge these upstanding Splitsider staffers and contributors if they happen to not share the same opinion as yourself, but applaud them for their honesty and unintentional vulnerability in revealing what they found to be their favorite Woodman movie, and why. To paraphrase Harry Block in Deconstructing Harry, we're all people that know the same truth, our lives consist of how we choose to distort it so we are more fond of Woodman films made before 1981 or after. READ MORE

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Follow Friday: @DammitBabies (Michael Scarpa A.K.A. Søren Twerkegaard)

Everybody fancies themselves as some sort of wizard that can conjure up laughter by a few strokes of a keyboard, but only a few tweeters are truly worthy enough to have all of their witticisms transmitted to you, the ever busy comedy fan trying to navigate through an increasingly congested internet. Every Friday we'll make your life a little bit easier by introducing you to an individual that you might not know about who consistently makes us laugh and momentarily forget that other days of the week exist.

(If you're reading this from an RSS feed, jump on over to the website where you can actually view the tweets for an optimal level of enjoyment.)

Michael Scarpa (@dammitbabies), more well known on the twittersphere by the decidedly funnier moniker of Søren Twerkegaard, was kind enough to fill us in on the stories behind some of his funniest tweets.

"This one just kind of popped into my head this way, basically fully formed. I don't usually do tweets like this but it was just a really funny scenario to me so I went with it. I don't even know with this one." READ MORE

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'Children's Hospital' Just Goes Up and Moves to Japan; 'NTSF:SD:SUV' Stays at Home

Children's Hospital and NTSF:SD:SUV air Thursday nights at midnight and 12:15 a.m. Eastern on Adult Swim. By Thursday I mean really early Friday mornings.

Back in the good old days, before season four of Community was all we complained about, there was season three of Community to complain about. Dan Harmon had watched The Wire the previous summer and gave his show an overarching narrative, with the idea that every episode had to be watched in order to best understand the motivations of the characters and to better appreciate the jokes. The meticulous planning ultimately produced some great stuff at times, and abrupt, forgettable conclusions to some subplots at others. This would turn out to be nothing compared to season four of Arrested Development, an incredibly ambitious puzzle of a season of television that also happened to be a comedy, which seemed way too obsessed with trying to pay off jokes that were set up multiple episodes earlier and too happy to have Ron Howard explain the accomplishment. After this past Memorial Day weekend, there was still no comedic series that utilized the model of a contemporary, prestigious, meticulously plotted drama to a wholly satisfying, cohesive, and funny season. It's possible that it's impossible to do such a thing, that by knowing what episode 15 will involve, episode 1's punchlines are hamstrung by the inability to make the funniest joke pitched in the writers room because it would ruin an intended continuity. READ MORE

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11 Shows That Went Head-to-Head With 'SNL' and Lost

Saturday Night Live is an institution that has been considered overrated and underrated since its debut in 1975, always provoking debate, always somewhere on the minds of everyone in the comedy world, and subsequently and most importantly of all, always watched and analyzed every single week. And it seems that from the very beginning, everybody that wasn't NBC knew that they were screwed, and have continually opted to not counter with their own original programming. Fox seems to be the one network that refuses to admit defeat, throwing up their own comedy shows on Saturday nights since 1989, and returning to the weekend late night original programming game with their ADHD block of Axe Cop and High School USA! tomorrow night. But it turns out that throwing up syndicated repeats of CSI, Grey's Anatomy, or another airing of Zack and Miri Make a Porno might be the right call, if the past is any indication. Here are 11 shows that dared to challenge Lorne Michaels and his not ready for primetime players, and 11 failures. READ MORE

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'Andy and His Grandmother': Andy Kaufman Is Still Trying to Mess With You From the Grave

Andy Kaufman is definitely dead. He definitely died at the too-young age of 35 years old of lung cancer in 1984. But because he was a comedian who for the last few years of his life loved to prank people, even smart folks believe that he is still alive. It is the power of Kaufman (and the leg work of Bob Zmuda continually dressing up as Kaufman character Tony Clifton) to keep the ruse going almost thirty years later, but it keeps the spotlight on the practical joke aspect of Andy Kaufman's professional career, and continues to overshadow the other types of comedy he had done. The man did love his Mighty Mouse.

Andy and His Grandmother, a comedy album culled from 82 hours of micro-cassette recordings Kaufman had made from 1977-1979, is an entertaining collection of works that both showcase Andy's earlier, sillier, more innocent material and the very provocative, antagonistic work he was known for once he achieved fame. Vernon Chapman, the co-creator of Wonder Showzenand The Heart, She Holler, and Towlie on South Park, picked out a little over 47 minutes of the tapes to make into as cohesive of a concept work as possible, producing effects on the more ambitious works that were clearly incomplete in their current state. Chapman recruited Bill Hader to provide narration whenever it was necessary. READ MORE

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Kanye West's 'Curb Your Enthusiasm' Pilot Was Pre-tty, Pre-tty Fascinating

One week after a clip of Kanye West's failed HBO comedy pilot was discovered hiding in plain sight and subsequently taken down by the TV network that purports to not be TV, Wyatt Cenac decided to answer the call and be a hero, screening the episode in its entirety at his weekly Night Train show at Littlefield in Gowanus. I was fortunate enough to be in the audience to watch one of the most fascinating failed pilots of all time. READ MORE

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Vine 5 Film Festival: The Deal With Luggage

Vine is a toy from Twitter that challenges users to make the most profound work ever committed to video in exactly six seconds. Or at the very least, challenges comedians to bring a little more laughter into this world. Every Tuesday we showcase five of the funniest short shorts of the past week.

Your RSS feed might be difficult and not show the videos, but trust us – they are there.

This time around, Jerry Seinfeld, God, and possibly Haley Joel Osment make their Vine debuts, a sock puppet bails out of the bit,.the classic children's game Operation gets a little too real, and someone goes to jail. READ MORE

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'Where's Rodney?' Was One of the Many Questions Raised By 'Where's Rodney?'

"One, Poochie needs to be louder, angrier, and have access to a time machine. Two, whenever Poochie's not on-screen, all the other characters should be asking 'Where's Poochie?' Three…" — Homer Simpson, "The Itchy & Scratchy & Poochie Show"

"Kids, they can see other kids all the time do the things they do but when they see an adult with a childlike sensibility or a silly sensibility that's what kids would love. That's like Rodney. That's why kids love Rodney." — Todd Glass, "The Bitter Buddha"

On a random Monday night in the summer of 19901, NBC for thirty minutes quietly threw Where's Rodney? on the air. It was summer burn-off theater, a pilot that did not get picked up to series that the network decided to show because viewers might be tricked into believing it was some sort of Rodney Dangerfield special (which it kind of was). The show was produced by the powerful, esteemed Aaron Spelling Productions, but it was written by two men who do not have IMDB pages. It starred comedy icon Rodney Dangerfield, but he only appeared for a combined four to five minutes out of the twenty two that weren't commercials. The conceit was elegantly simplistic and cool in theory: a 14-year-old, plagued by all of the typical problems a 14-year-old in a lower-middle middle class family who isn't classified as cool by the social gatekeepers at the school he attends, has the ability to teleport his hero Rodney Dangerfield from thin air to wherever he is to give him some advice. The problem was that Rodney Dangerfield stole the show that was about him, significantly overshadowing the eighty percent of Where's Rodney? when nobody knew the answer to the title's question. READ MORE